About

Kyriacos Kareklas, 2018

 

FROM MECHANISMS

TO FUNCTIONS

 

Research by Kyriacos Kareklas and Colleagues

The website:


The purpose of this website is to present the research and  findings of the author and his colleagues and to provide access to our evidence-based discussions to both other researchers and the broader public.


The place:


Currently located in the Medical Biology Center at Queen's University Belfast (QUB), the Cognition and Animal Navigation (CAN) laboratory has been focused on converging work on four broad topics: navigation, spatial cognition, sensory mechanisms, individual and social behaviour. The work has been mainly carried out in model-species of teleost fish, such as the electrosensing Peters' elephantonose fish, the shoaling zebrafish, the fast aging killifish, the social guppies and the competitive male Siamese fighting fish. The research is in collaboration with the Animal Communication and Behaviour group, the Ecosystem Biology & Sustainability cluster at the School of Biological Sciences and the Institute of Global Food Security at QUB.


The author:

Dr. Kyriacos Kareklas

Behaviour and cognition


My work is based on integrative and interdisciplinary research, with an interest in the interaction of animals with their environment and others, focusing on mechanisms and functions of cognition and behaviour, phenotypic plasticity and adaptation. I have worked within and between the fields of ecology, behaviour, cognition, neuroscience and evolutionary biology. I am fascinated by many taxons with past research involving corals, annelids, fish, birds and humans.



Collaborators:

Dr. Gareth Arnott

Contest behaviour and animal welfare


Dr. Hansjoerg Kunc

Animal communication and behavioural plasticity


Dr. Richard Holland

Navigation, spatial cognition and sensory systems

 

Prof. Robert Elwood

Animal behaviour, ecology and evolution

NEWS:

 

Wednesday 29th August – Thursday 30th August 2018

 

Join us for an ASAB workshop  at Queen's University Belfast on ‘Broader perspectives on animal contests’. Organised by our collegue Gareth Arnott and Sarah Lane, Plymouth University